SCOPE Synopsis, July 2012 #6

Standards of Practice for Health Promotion in Higher Education

http://www.acha.org/Publications/docs/Standards_of_Practice_for_Health_Promotion_in_Higher_Education_May2012.pdf

The American College Health Association’s (ACHA) Task Force on Health Promotion in Higher Education has released a third edition of guidelines to assess and provide quality assurance for health promotion in higher education. The following principles inform the document: “health is the capacity of individuals and communities to reach their potential; the specific purpose of health promotion in higher education is to support student success; institutions of higher education are communities; health promotion professionals in higher education practice prevention; health promotion in higher education is facilitating, rigorous, and inclusive.”

The seven standards outlined are: “alignment with the missions of higher education; socioecological-based practice; collaborative practice; cultural competency; theory-based practice; evidence-informed practice; continuing professional development and service.”

State Laws to Reduce the Impact of Alcohol Marketing on Youth: Current Status and Model Policies

http://www.camy.org/action/Legal_Resources/State%20Ad%20Laws/CAMY_State_Alcohol_Ads_Report_2012.pdf

The $4 billion annually spent by the alcohol industry greatly effects underage youth, increasing their likelihood of drinking or drinking more. The Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth (CAMY) offers best practice provisions on content and placement, as well as promotions, to regulate alcohol advertising.

The provisions include: “prohibit false or misleading alcohol advertising; prohibit alcohol advertising that targets minors; establish explicit jurisdiction over in-state electronic media; restrict outdoor alcohol advertising in locations where children are likely to be present; restrict alcohol advertising on alcohol retail outlet windows and in outside areas; prohibit alcohol advertising on college campuses; restrict sponsorship of civic events; limit giveaways (contests, raffles, etc.).”

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